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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From a pier, you will need two rods and reels for live bait king fishing. One rod is used to cast your anchor line. The anchor rod is typically a 10-15 foot surf type rod, using 20 pound test to sling a 4-8 ounce anchor.

The bait is attached to the end of the fighting rod which is a medium to heavy action, 6-7’ foot with a 4/0-9/0 size reel and using on average 30 pound test. Generally you will want a reel that holds at least 500 yards of 30 pound mono, you can't chase the fish with the pier :D

Make the leader for the fighting/bait rod out of 6-foot of 100 pound mono attached to two feet of 90 pound seven strand wire and two #4 treble. There are several variation/preferences to this rigging but the idea is to protect against sharp teeth (wire) and getting broke off by rubbing against the pier pilings (100# mono).

Take your anchor rod and sling the anchor out and secure it to the bottom. Then you will attach your baited fighting line to the anchor line. This rig consists of a loop clip, a weight and clothes pen. The loop clip, usually something like a shower curtain clip with weight goes on your anchor line and the clothes pen attaches to the bait line. An alternative is store bought release clip.

Now lower your bait down to the water on the anchor line. You can adjust the depth of your bait in the water by how far up the bait line you attach the clothes pen. Most fishermen keep the baits down about 3-4 feet, but it’s not uncommon to see baits on top or as far deep as 6 feet.

The force of a strike will release the bait line from the clothes pen. Take multiple clothespin/release clips – that way you don’t need to pull up the anchor line every time the fighting line releases from the clip.

Live baits of choice vary-but almost always consist of what is available from the pier at the time. Bluefish, pogies, spots, pinfish and even lizard fish are used as baits.

You will need a grapnel type gaff that is lowered by rope to gaff the fish and then hauled on deck.

Now you are ready to fish!
 

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Topsail Angler I enjoyed your instructions on King Mack fishing from the pier. I plan on doing just that the 1st week in September. How do you think the fishing will be this early in the fall/late summer? I have never caught anything of size from the pier but its because I have always fished with a 2 hook line with shrimp I guess. I've always shyed away from the end of the pier and never fished for Kings. What other suggestions do you have? Is this time a little late for flounder?

Thanks...Jim
 

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Topsail Angler I enjoyed your instructions on King Mack fishing from the pier. I plan on doing just that the 1st week in September. How do you think the fishing will be this early in the fall/late summer? I have never caught anything of size from the pier but its because I have always fished with a 2 hook line with shrimp I guess. I've always shyed away from the end of the pier and never fished for Kings. What other suggestions do you have? Is this time a little late for flounder?

Thanks...Jim
You can catch flounder on the pier from now through December. I caught my first keepers of the year this year in April.The late fall fish are big ones, but the bite depends on the weather.
 

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Topsail, great information on the setup. I use this setup now but I see or hear alot of people doing different things, last week I was trying to fish around a guy using a float type rig that had live bait and seemed to have a mind of its own swimming close to the pier in my way rather then out away from the pier where it needed to be. :mad:. He snagged my setup a few times, and I had to bring in the bait and the anchor line and re-cast and setup. I had a few questions, for the weight used to clip the bait line to the anchor line, how heavy are the weights you use? I also use a snap swivel to connect anchor line and then drilled a hole in the clothes pin to clip the bait line, I have heard that you need to drill two holes rather just one into the clothes pin. Then when I try to zip off my bait line I have issues with my anchor line slacking, and when I reel up the anchor line the anchor itself dosent set and I wind up bringing the whole set up in (I also have a pvc pipe to set my 7' anchor pole). I have also heard of someone recommending to try to attach a homemade chum tube to the anchor line. Since you have a great post on the setup, I would like to find out what I am doing wrong, the anchor was purchased at Gander Mtn, its a 4oz lead weight with copper leads. Both of my lines have the lb test you recommend in your post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The weight of the sinker is one factor but also the style is important. Most folks use a small grapple type weight as it digs into the sand better than a bank or pyramid sinker. Going up to 6 or 8 ounces may be needed as well just as Speckhunter mentioned. Just be sure not to overdo it as you will risk breaking your anchor line and losing the sinker and the price of lead isn't getting any cheaper.

I'm not sure what the second hole would be for. Guess it depends on how you rig the swivel clip to the clothespin. I just poke the line through the hole and tie a knot bigger than the hole.

I use 1/2 ounce to 2 ounce egg sinker on the clothespin depending on how deep you want the bait to go. Usually you want him near the surface so a small one just helps the rig go down the line.

The balloon rig you mentioned is used by some to get the bait further away from the pier. It really is only effective when the wind is blowing directly off the end of the pier - otherwise you get what you witnessed - a mess.

Hope that helps.
 

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Saw this while reading about how to tell the difference between a young king and a spanish.

Food Value :Edible, but the greenish-gray flesh color and strong taste discourages most consumption. King mackerel consistently test highest of all Gulf of Mexico fish for the presence of mercury in their flesh. High levels of mercury in fish consumed over an extended period of time has been linked to birth defects and other illnesses in humans. Because of this, consumption advisories have been issued by every Gulf state for king mackerel.
 

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Pretty much all true....don't think they are the absolute highest in mercury but close. A lot depends on the age and size of the fish tested. The bigger fish eat bigger bait fish like spanish mackerel and blue runners which are higher in mercury than the plankton eating species like herrings and menhaden. If you want to eat kings it would be healthier to eat the smaller ones. Kings aren't by any stretch inedible though. By the same token they don't hold a candle to some of the best eating fish.
 

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I agree kings are not the best eating but of all the fish I have caught off the pier they are the most fun. There are very few fish caught from the pier that can run 200-500 yds of line off ,jump straight up 10' amd cut an achor line, and jump horizontaly over 70' cross over 3 other anchor lines and 2 more fighting lines. These just a few of the thing I have seen in my years. I don't king fish off the pier as much as I used too, but I can't quit. It is hard to get out of your system once you start. I only went 5 times this year, but its a game. I still want to beat my personal best 35lb( twice ) and quanity ( 4 kings landed in one day, this happened twice too). I took my son king fishing the first time this year and when ever we go go now that is all he wants to do, he's 5. So don't start if you don't want to get hooked.
 

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Red X Angler
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I've never tried it. But I have watched some nice ones come over the rail. As I am getting better equipped (Like the live bait King rod I just won at the NC Sportsman Mag Seminar) I would love to try it. I need a hands on tutorial to get it right though. I have the rod, I have the 12ft surf rig for the anchor line, now I need a reel with that kind of line capacity to finish it off! I'm watching Ebay and shaking the pawn shops for something adequate that won't break the bank and maybe can double as a troller sometime or a deep sea reel..
 
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Hey guys ,im planning on trying some pier kingfishing this year.I've got a 4/0 penn senator reel.Any suggestions on how tight to set the drag on the fighting rod? Also will a regular clothespin hold the weight of a live bait while you are lowering it to the water?
 

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yakidyak

You can use the clothespin type release clip, the other option is to take about 4 inches of wire 80# double it and run it through a 1/2 oz egg sinker take the two pointy ends run two beads of your color choice over the wire then bend the wire back. Take a swivel and loop it on your line above the leader then stick the wire back through the swivel. When the fish hits it will pop it right out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hey guys ,im planning on trying some pier kingfishing this year.I've got a 4/0 penn senator reel.Any suggestions on how tight to set the drag on the fighting rod? Also will a regular clothespin hold the weight of a live bait while you are lowering it to the water?
I like to set my drag at about 2 or 3 pounds when king fishing - very light in other words. Kings are slasher feeders, if the drag is too tight they will feel the pressure and not consume the bait. Also it reduces the likelihood of a puller hook during that initial run.
 

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I have never King fished off the pier either, always planned on it but something always gets in the way. I do a lot of plugging for Spanish and blues and some bottom fishing depending on whats bitting.

I know this for a fact the boys that are King fishing work for every fish they catch. They have to catch bait, set up different rods and tend those rods a long time in between bites. They deserve those fish and I give em wide berth to run up and down chasing them Kings.

tight lines <*)))))>{
 

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Scott we need to get some of us together one day and have a hands on training at one of the piers!!
 
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how do you make agrapnel type gaff or do you buy one, that is lowered by rope to gaff the fish and then hauled on deck.










From a pier, you will need two rods and reels for live bait king fishing. One rod is used to cast your anchor line. The anchor rod is typically a 10-15 foot surf type rod, using 20 pound test to sling a 4-8 ounce anchor.

The bait is attached to the end of the fighting rod which is a medium to heavy action, 6-7’ foot with a 4/0-9/0 size reel and using on average 30 pound test. Generally you will want a reel that holds at least 500 yards of 30 pound mono, you can't chase the fish with the pier :D

Make the leader for the fighting/bait rod out of 6-foot of 100 pound mono attached to two feet of 90 pound seven strand wire and two #4 treble. There are several variation/preferences to this rigging but the idea is to protect against sharp teeth (wire) and getting broke off by rubbing against the pier pilings (100# mono).

Take your anchor rod and sling the anchor out and secure it to the bottom. Then you will attach your baited fighting line to the anchor line. This rig consists of a loop clip, a weight and clothes pen. The loop clip, usually something like a shower curtain clip with weight goes on your anchor line and the clothes pen attaches to the bait line. An alternative is store bought release clip.

Now lower your bait down to the water on the anchor line. You can adjust the depth of your bait in the water by how far up the bait line you attach the clothes pen. Most fishermen keep the baits down about 3-4 feet, but it’s not uncommon to see baits on top or as far deep as 6 feet.

The force of a strike will release the bait line from the clothes pen. Take multiple clothespin/release clips – that way you don’t need to pull up the anchor line every time the fighting line releases from the clip.

Live baits of choice vary-but almost always consist of what is available from the pier at the time. Bluefish, pogies, spots, pinfish and even lizard fish are used as baits.

You will need a grapnel type gaff that is lowered by rope to gaff the fish and then hauled on deck.

Now you are ready to fish!
 
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