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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there such a thing as a quality spincasting reel? The only spinning rod/reel combination that I own right now is a ultra-light shakespeare with a small (4# test) spincasting reel. This is great for crappie, but I am aspiring to battle some big bass. I'm trying to put together a quality rig for going after the bass and I would prefer to get another spincasting reel, particularly with the casting lever above the reel like this one.

Any advice on the world's best spincasting reel? All the ones I come across googling are in the $10-$20 range, really hard to tell which is better than the other.

Or should I be a man and learn how to cast a baitcaster? :)
 

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Shakespeare makes a nice spincast, but I would venture to say that there has probably been more Zebco 33s sold than anything else.

I would say it would be better to learn to use a baitcaster. Particularly since you're wanting to chase Hawg Bass. Most of the better baitcasters have a centrifugal braking system and spool tensioner that gives you more control of the cast and helps prevent backlashing during the cast. They are really a lot easier to use than they used to be. Some Other benefits of the baitcaster;

Virtually no line twist.
More line capacity
Longer casting. The line on a spincast or spinning reel slaps the rod between the reel and the first eye causing drag on the line. Also, the spinning equipment often causes the lure to tumble during the cast. The baitcaster throws the lure straight giving you more distance and casting accuracy.

I use 7"6" or 8ft medium action rods with 20 size round baitcasters on the coast and I love the distance that I get with these set ups. The distance is especially important when sight fishing tailing reds .
 

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d-el,
I bought a Zebco Omega a couple years ago - $50 spincaster. Supposed to have top quality parts, bearings & engineering. It definitely has a nice handle. I bought it to have a quality rig in the boat for guests & kids. I was never really happy with the way it felt in the hand or the way it retrieved line - inherent design flaw in pretty much all spincasters that the line makes a sharp turn around either a small peg or an undulation in the spool cover on its way back to the spool. Seemed worse in the Omega than in a standard Zebco 33. If I were to do it again I'd probably stick with one of the zebco 33 series between $19-29 bucks (tried and true for years) or try one of the expensive Abu's like this one - actually made for braid.

Honestly, if you're the primary user, you're probably ready for the step up in technology. Significant design advantages in quality spinning reels and (IMHO) even moreso in baitcasters, especially for fighting bigger fish. You'll pick up the baitcaster with no problems, especially a decent one with multiple spool controls. Its more a matter of where you're going to use it and whether you'll have the room to effectively work a baitcaster. Spinning/spincasters are generally better in tight spaces, like shorelines with overhangs & such.
 

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d-el,

I believe that you are asking about another spinning reel which is "open face". A spin-cast reel is closed face as some of the ones mentioned, Zebco Omegas and 33's.

You asked what are the world's best spinning reels. Check out the link below. These are Van-Staal reels. They run in the $700-$800 range.

Welcome To Van Staal - No Limitations

Mark
 

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Hey D-el, it's what you want to spend and with the recommendations above, dont think you can go wrong. On reels, you do get what you pay for in a way, but plenty of good reels to be had.

I use Shimano Sedona's for freshwater stuff in the 1000, 2000 and 4000 series sizes
http://fish.shimano.com/catalog/fish/products/group_detail.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302036673&ASSORTMENT%3C%3East_id=1408474395181270&bmUID=1176994273441
They work great and I've had them for what seem's like forever. I replaced my Mitchell and Dam Quick reels with them (the Shimano's)

Another reel I like for freshwater, that's known as saltwater reels, are the Penn SS 4300 and 4400's. The 4300 will last you forever and is perfect for light line or braid line fishing.
Penn Fishing Reels: Spinfisher 4300SS

Now that my one boy is getting into fishin pretty good, I went and got 4 setup's with the Okuma AV-50 reels. Great little reels and only reason I went with them is because I use the big brother AV-80's for our salt water light tackle stuff for floater and casting lines. The AV's have held up very well.. and at a price under $40 for the big'n's the little ones just over $30.. they're definately a great price on a good reel.
Okuma Avenger Freshwater Spinning Reels

Lot's of flavors for sure, but the way reels are made now days, it's truely hard not to pick a good one. Just stay away from them bargin bin combo's they sell at Walmart and stuff.. get a quality outfit (rod and reel), you'll want to fish more than fight with your tackle/gear.

here's a pic of our Okuma gear (cost was $35 for the reel and $12 for the Shakespear 7 ft 2 piece cork handled rods at Walmart).. so for under $50 I'm not so worried if the boy drops it in the water... That's the AV-50 set up in the rod holder. I spool his stuff up with Berkeley Tournament 6 lb test in Hi vis yellow


For bait casters,, I havent a clue...

Set the tackle monkey free! :)
 

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I apologize for listing the Van-Staals as I know they are more than likely out of most folk's price range. kinda neat to look at though!

As Dave and others have said there are plenty of good inexpensive reels on the market. eBay is a good place to look for a deal.
I am partial to the old Silstar CT series reels. I purchased a CT40 on ebay recently for $9 and it was brand new in the box. I also have a CT50, CT60 and CT70.
The less expensive Bass Pro Shop house brand reels are very nice for the money. I have 2 of them that I purchased in the early 90's and still use them today. You can get one today for around $25-$30.
The Shakspeare spinning reels work well also and you can get a Shakspeare Contender combo (rod & reel) at Wal Mart right now for $29. I have one of them that I have been using to pier and sound fish that I bought about 3 years ago.

If the Lord allows me the means to do so one day I am going to get me one of those Van-Staals!

Mark
 

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I've got one also (the shakespeare combo). It's my primary fishing combo right now since I'm fishing from the shore. I have no complaints about it.
 

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Penn 103c Silver series is my favorite. Penn has retired this reel and replaced it with the "Silverado model". You can still find them on ebay sometimes brand new. I have bought them on ebay for 15-20 dollars. Some stores still have them and they are usually around $50. I use the Penn 103c on 7-8 foot Allstar rods and have no trouble casting a 1/4 ounce trout jig. It is not a tiny reel, but it is a very versatile reel. I use them for flounder, sheephead, trout, spanish, etc.. Tica makes a very nice machine also.
 

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I've got the same issue as d-el except maybe he's not tried a bait caster. I let the jerks at Bass Pro Shops talk me (twice now) into buying some very expensive rigs with all the bells and whistles and the best I can do is about a 75' side cast. I can NOT cast overhand with them, I mean I've had 6 people set them up now and all I do is jam a crapload (technical term) of backlash into them. I'm 6'2" and built like a mountain gorilla, and play golf like one too. Maybe I'm just trying to kill the rod and reel when casting, but I've all but given up on those open-faced bait casters. They are beautiful, and I wish I could figure out why I'm such a putz when it comes to using them...
 

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RobinH - I use to have the same problem (I'm a shorter version of that gorilla you described). I tried many times to throw a baitcaster with little success. Spent some time with a pro (a guide) and walla..... with practice I can cast that baby just fine. It's all in the timing and finesse (something we gorillas don't know much about - we like POWER).
 

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Baitcasters are definitely the way to go once you get comfortable with what you are doing. All it take is just about one day of practice.
I have several Abu Garcia reels. 6500's, 5500's and 4500's. I never could get use to those fancy reels with the magnetic spool controls. One of these days I am going to get one of the 7000 series for heavy surf.

Mark
 

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"I can NOT cast overhand with them" (baitcasters)
Nothing quite like a baitcaster on a full-rip overhead rocket launch cast that incorporates chest, shoulder and back muscles. If you're trying hard enough you can launch your bait a lot farther this way than when it actually stays connected to the line... (haven't figured out the best retrieve yet for this situation, mine usually incorporates a trip to a tackle shop). It gets less and less frequent over time, but still happens to the best of us in moments of excitement, usually when a feeding school starts breaking the surface just outside of casting range.

Like Topsail said - "It's all in the timing and finesse". That's where the learned man starts. The rest of us are more likely to pick it up from negative reinforcement - we get tired enough of picking out backlashes that we slowly figure out what it was we were trying to do and we just don't try to do that anymore (ie. full blown overhead gorilla ax chops).

There's also an element of "system" to it - rods load differently and deliver different levels of acceleration to the lure as it leaves, as will the different weights and air resistance characteristics of different baits. The same exact cast on one rod might yield completely different backlash results on a different rod, even with the same reel and same spool control settings. Same cast on a 1/4oz crankbait might not work on a 3/8oz jig (and vice versa).

I bought my first baitcaster with paper route money almost 30 years ago and have used them regularly as a "weekend angler" ever since. Even so, I suspect that if I picked up any touring b.a.s.s. pro's well-tuned combo and tried to make a normal cast with it I might not be able to avoid overrunning the spool. Somebody that uses them day after day after day is going to have a lot more timing and finesse than someone who uses them once a week. The once-a-week-er for years is going to have a lot more timing and finesse than a first-timer. Patience, practice and persistence pay off with baitcasters (along with a strip of electrical tape across the spool about 30 yards in
).
 

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I would say it would be better to learn to use a baitcaster. Particularly since you're wanting to chase Hawg Bass. Most of the better baitcasters have a centrifugal braking system and spool tensioner that gives you more control of the cast and helps prevent backlashing during the cast. They are really a lot easier to use than they used to be. Some Other benefits of the baitcaster;

Virtually no line twist.
More line capacity
Longer casting. The line on a spincast or spinning reel slaps the rod between the reel and the first eye causing drag on the line. Also, the spinning equipment often causes the lure to tumble during the cast. The baitcaster throws the lure straight giving you more distance and casting accuracy.
quote]

Thanks Backlash. I have been considering a baitcaster for a long time, but never pulled the plug- mainly because I cannot see retraiing my hands the other way since I use an open face feel with L/H retrieve. So today I let the tackle monkey take over and bought one. A decent special at Dick's- a Daiwa- for $70. I hope I can figure it out! I bought a bunch of extra line incase I need to cut out a bunch of birdnests.

Any body have any preferences on line? Here's what I DON'T like: Bought Yozyuri Mono on sale at ProBass the other day. Twists horribly. Maybe another thread subject?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for all of your posts! I am tempted to go get a baitcasting rig now, but I think I may hold off. I am brand new to bass fishing this year, and am so ignorant about catching bass that I want to focus on learning how to catch them. I think I would get really frustrated picking backlashes out of my line at this early stage in my bass fishing career. Once I get confident at catching them, then I'll step up my tackle technology.

My current ultra-light is this Shakespeare combo. I am really partial to that "Underspin" casting mechanism, so I think I may try getting a similar combo in the Medium weight/10# test line setup that Shakespeare offers.

Looks like Dick's has it for 25 bucks, can't go wrong at that price. Even if I decide that it won't do as my go-to bass rod, it will make a great spare.
 
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