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Hi all, we are moving soon, and 99.9% sure well be moving to a neighborhood with a small lake (about 300 yards long). I am looking for a lightweight, portable boat that I can carry perhaps a few hundred feet to the water. I was just wondering what my options are for lightweight kayaks that a fishing friendly. I have found other options as well, such as the porta-bote, which is a folding boat, which weights about 70 lbs. Hoping for something less (I am not winning and weight lifting competitions anytime soon) ;) Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

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SIKs are going to be the lightest in general, and quite a few people on here get good use out of them.

The 14.5 Ultimate (hybrid) is very fishing friendly and can be used as a tandem or solo. 60 or so pounds with both seats in. They work well and can be adapted for all types of fishing, a good cart is a must if you are taking it any distance to the water and on decent ground makes even an unwieldy beast handleable.

Mikeski has a fiberglass canoe on the classifieds that would make a great pond/slow river boat.

Try some out or look for a CL deal so that you can change boats without taking much of a loss.

Darrell
 

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if you are set on a yak get a manta ray and it has that wheel on the back....good for short walks. just pick up the front and pull.
 
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70# is awfully high for a one person kayak. My 10' is around 40# and it's a sit on top. Definitely recommend a cart. Kayaks are are awkward to carry solo without turning them upside down and then you have to make two trips. One for the boat and one for your gear. With a cart you can leave it loaded all the time.
 

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70# is actually quite normal for rotomolded sit on tops. Some of the hobies go over 100. I think a ride 135 is in the 80s range. If you are only fishing a lake 300 yards long don't waste your money on a name brand kayak (if its actually the only place you'll kayak). Go to Wal-mart, Dicks, Dunhams, etc. and get one of their cheaper yaks with rod holders and stuff. They are much lighter than the name brand stuff.
 

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I think a lot of the native yaks are very light weight. Also look at a solo Old Town canoe. They're pretty light, I plan on getting one soon.

My kayak is about 75 pounds I think. I understand your concerns with the weight, but I'm about 150 dripping wet and manage carrying it pretty well. A 12ft yak is cumbersome more than anything, so it's important to have a system that works for transporting and cartopping. Like others said, a cart is helpful.
 

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70# is actually quite normal for rotomolded sit on tops. Some of the hobies go over 100. I think a ride 135 is in the 80s range. If you are only fishing a lake 300 yards long don't waste your money on a name brand kayak (if its actually the only place you'll kayak). Go to Wal-mart, Dicks, Dunhams, etc. and get one of their cheaper yaks with rod holders and stuff. They are much lighter than the name brand stuff.
you are correct. A ride 135 is 85#. I thought to myself before I bought it, as heck I'm young. You should see me trying to get that beast on top the Tahoe by myself.... They aren't heavy as they are awkward.
 
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As was stated, a sit-in yak will be lighter...maybe only about 45 lbs. for something about 10'...should be fine for the body of water you are interested in. The wheeled boat carts make transport pretty easy for just about anything. The Old Town Pack canoes are pretty light...as are most shorter canoes made out of Royalex. A well-made fiberglass canoe can be quite light... I have two Mad River fiberglass canoes that are 14 and 15' 6"...they only weigh about 45 lbs. On a boat cart that is nothing...and you can put your gear inside when transporting. However, a well-made glass canoe will not be cheap...unless you can find a used one lurking somewhere.
 

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No matter the weight use a kayak cart but not all are equal. I prefer large diameter wheels. It goes much better over uneven surfaces like roots, grass clumps, etc. Heck, I've pulled 2 stacked boats 1/4 mile uphill (Chattooga section 2 take out) no problem. Trail was gravel and well maintained tho. I also adjusted the gear so that it was balanced and I just pulling AND NOT holding up a lot of weight too.

If it's a few hundred feet and the surface is not abrasive, just tie a 10 ft rope to the bow and drag it.

Derek
 

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if you can find a cart for cheap, around 20-30 bucks that would be great. I refused to go pay 80 bucks for the one dicks and most places sell so I went to tractor supply bought two wheelbarrow tires and rigged on up myself using 2x4s. think the wheels where 5-10 bucks each and you can get a 8 foot 2x4 for 2-3 bucks. Id rather spend that extra 50 bucks on tackle and gas to go fishing!
 

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I have the 10' K-Mart SIK (Sun Dolphin). Poke around on line and you will find a $25 off coupon to bring it down to ~ $175 delivered (free shipping to local store for pickup). 39# empty. Fishing friendly? You would have to fit it out a bit, but it works out well enough; over size cockpit means you can keep a soft tackle bag between your knees and get in it easily enough. Add a rod holder or two and you are still only around $200.

Having said all that, I think my preference in your situation would be a fiberglass canoe. Here is an example:
http://www.indianrivercanoemfg.com/beaver.htm
That one weighs 42#

I love my yak for a lot of different situations. But if I were buying a boat for your specific situation it would be a canoe.
 

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I am not sure of the stability of that particular one; I just know Indian River is a good source of light, cheap blown fiberglass canoes, which would be my choice as a dedicated pond boat (a terrible choice for a rocky river though). I would probably be shopping CL for a used Mohawk or a number of other brands also. If you have a big war chest, Kevlar canoes can be really light and strong.
 
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