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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went out with my buddy last night to his farm pond. Big thunderstorm had passed through just before we put the boat in. Water was muddy as all get out, like chocolate milk. We tried everything in our tackle boxes but got skunked. Man I Hate That!

When I fly fish, the muddy water usually means I go to big and ugly flies in dark colors so I tried that last night with my jigs and crank baits. Also Tried all sorts of plastic worms and craw patterns in the darkest colors I had. Even tried some spinner baits but all I had was white/chartreuse colors. I couldn't find the 1/4 stick of dynamite, but was ready to use it by the time we left.


Guess that's why it's called fishing, not catching. Good excuse to go back tonight I reckon...
 

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Red X Angler
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Smaller waters that are usually pretty clear get very tough to find a bite when they mud up. Just have to keep at it till they turn back on. Sounds like you probably did the right things. I might have tried a creature bait on a drop shot and just keep wiggling it in place for as long as you can stand it, hoping the fish will eventually find it or key in on the vibration, but that's all theory crafting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Smaller waters that are usually pretty clear get very tough to find a bite when they mud up. Just have to keep at it till they turn back on. Sounds like you probably did the right things. I might have tried a creature bait on a drop shot and just keep wiggling it in place for as long as you can stand it, hoping the fish will eventually find it or key in on the vibration, but that's all theory crafting.
Thanks for the suggestion surfrider. I am definitely low on patience, like most newbies I guess. Also, I currently only have two casting rigs and I really need to add a lighter spinning rod/reel to my arsenal. I think drop shot technique is best on such a set up? I was actually looking around the forum earlier looking for suggestions for my first spinning combo. I think a trip to my local Gander Mountain is in order. I'm gonna need a bigger boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ive noticed that the fish usually just arent interested in feeding after the storm, but before they are in a feeding frenzy. Its all about the barometric pressure.


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I'm learning stuff every day bassmaster3363. I pretty much knew that the muddy water would be a problem, but didn't think about the high or low pressure. Is it the big swing in pressure right before and after a big storm that affects the fish, or are specific barometric pressure situations preferred?
 

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The drop in barometric pressure before the storm is usually when the fish start feeding. Pros such as Mike Iaconelli keep barometers in the boat etc. A good sign to look for is high winds and the leaves turning over that is a sin of a drop in pressure. If I was at the pond you were at I would probably fish a black trickworm on a dropshot or shaky head or like you mentioned use a spinnerbait (with colorado blades!!!) and slow roll it so the fish can hone in on it. I have fished muddy water before so if you have any other questions shoot me a pm and I would be happy to give you my two cents worth lol.


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I have never bought into the whole barometric pressure thing and fish biting or not biting. Weather changes dont stop them from eating, it just changes the conditions so they go somewhere else to eat based on the changing conditions.
 

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Red X Angler
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I have never bought into the whole barometric pressure thing and fish biting or not biting. Weather changes dont stop them from eating, it just changes the conditions so they go somewhere else to eat based on the changing conditions.
I think that is mostly true for larger bodies of water, but I do think that for ponds and very small lakes, abrupt changes in conditions do tend to turn them off for a little.

I do also think that falling barometric pressure tends to spur more aggressive feeding, but I agree with Neil that on lakes fish can be found and caught in almost any conditions if you're diligent and patient to find them.
 

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I've been there. In muddy water you want to throw contrasting colors with a crank bait, I usually opt for a blackback chartruese with a rattle. Crank her real slow. If you are throwing anything metallic, you want to use bronze, not silver. A yellow white spinner with bronze willow blades may work as well. Key to plastics in muddy pond water is throw them weightless, and let them fall naturally. These are some basic tips to fishing muddy water, good luck!
 
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