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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So they are in a certain location for a few days or more then they are gone? I'm curious where they go? Do they just move around the creek and find another spot for a period of time or do they move pretty much constantly and I am seeing different schools on the days I've found them? I am just trying to figure out their basic behavior.
Like most of us here I imagine, when I clean fish I look for stomach contents. The last drum I cleaned had a stomach that was nearly empty. It only had one claw from a stone crab???
I read a book recently that provided details about the diet of these fish and how it changes depending on the seasons and the diet has less to do with what food is available and more to do with their habits.
Thanks
 

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There most always in the bay, may not be as schooled as in the winter but they are around. Use the trolling motor and search looking for pods or signs of them chasing mullet then make that long 40 yard cast and hold on. Nothing like it far as I'm concerned.
If I can't see them I blind cast banks with topwater and spoons and spinners. May have a lot of blowups but I don't leave until I land one. No matter how bad the bugs are. I need that fix. I only keep flounder and do enjoy seeing what they have been feeding on. Sometimes it's hard to believe.
 

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they move maybe only by 100 yards but they do move around but almost always they can be found right back where you first found them as long as there is bait to keep them there,always note what tide you found them on and when they were eating they are a tide fish changing slightly day to day with the tides,they move but not far they will always be close by even if you don't see them ;)
 

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There are no fences in fishing ( nets yes, fences no ).
Heavy fishing pressure, boat traffic & search for food, will cause them to move from a location.
I don't eat Reds either. Practice (CPR) catch, picture, release. ..... ICM
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. I always use the tide as my "clock" when returning to a spot where I caught the day(s) before. I canvases a good part of the creek blond casting after no action at the same time casting at any jumping bait. As normal there are tons of mullet. These spook and jump as part of their normal behavior FMOE. I'm pretty sure I can tell when their disruption is due to a being chased compared to their normal surface action. It seems that seeing shrimp jump is a more reliable indication the reds are around. If I tried to cast at every pod of nervous mullet I'd never get anywhere. When I see airborne shrimp I am more encouraged and will paddle a bit out of the way to make some casts.
It takes a lot of time and energy trying to efficiently hunt for drum in a kayak so I try to use both as effectively as I can to cover the most area. Many times I'll head into the wind to the farthest spot I want to prospect and work with the winds help in the direct it is blowing me to cover the area. Still the kayak only offers limited travel ability so I try to plan on what will provide the most coverage as I focus mainly on the edges of the spartina grass islands. Needless to say after paddling 10 or 20 minutes to my "starting point" the wind changes.
As far as C&R goes I keep my one measly red when I get one or more. I feel no guilt in taking this single fish and no problem with those that release all of their fish of course. In a perfect world I would catch a few drum and then go focus on flounder and I would keep my limit of them as well. My problem is this fixation with drum on top water which consumes the time I could be trying for flounder. There is just nothing I'd trade for the sight and sound of a drum taking a top water plug and the fight that a direct connection like this provides. I'd say a drum on top would be as close as it can get to getting one on a fly???


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Just remember this. If you go to your favorite restaurants daily and find that day they don't have what you're in the mood for, you go elsewhere. Follow the food while keeping your basic info, tides/winds/temps/cloudcover, in mind. Reds are opportunistic feeders but selective when food is abundant. Just like trout.
 
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Nah. This particular island has a herd of wild marsh tackey horses. The fence was put up to keep them from wandering off the hard pan flats and into pluff mud. It's all soft bottom on the other side of that fence.
Ok thanks. Would have never known it was for horses. You'd think marsh horses would know where to walk.
 
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