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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw the doc Friday about right elbow and shoulder pain. Shoulder was X-Rayed and then he did an ultrasound. Torn rotator cuff (but not quite all the way through) and a bone spur. Cortisone shot and will start some PT. Elbow is tendinitis and will hopefully get resolved with the forearm strap and PT. But one of the things he told me is that it is fine to keep doing almost anything as long as I keep the palm up when loading the arm. Anyone tried paddling that way? Just sitting in a chair going through the motions, it feels goofy but it may work okay. I guess I need to head out somewhere next weekend and just give it a try. The latest flare up did peak (in pain) after a recent paddling trip.
 

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I have something up with my right shoulder that will probably need to be addressed somewhere along the line. Doesn't often hurt when i'm paddling but it kinda bothers me a bit the night after. Maybe we should both get hobies or slayer propels....
 

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Had major surgery on a full thickness tear in my right shoulder a few years back. Still hurts often. I don't expect it to be fully recovered ever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They want some serious dollars for the pedal yaks and they are generally not quite as portable, but since the doc scoped my knee back in late spring that is an option. I am pretty much fully recovered from that. Shoulders are also generally easy to repair; he can shave the bone spur and repair the tear if PT doesn't give me satisfactory results. Elbows are a little dicier; I need to get used to doing some things differently to avoid flare ups.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Had major surgery on a full thickness tear in my right shoulder a few years back. Still hurts often. I don't expect it to be fully recovered ever.
The silver lining is he is pretty sure mine isn't a full tear based on the ultrasound and the amount I can bear to use it.
 

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OptiMystic - this kind of should/wrist/elbow pain is what prompted me to switch to a pedal-propelled system (Native Mariner 12.5 Propel). If that becomes a possibility for you, I'd test out a Native Propel system as well as a Hobie system. I think the mechanics are slightly different (I've only heard about the Hobie's; I know about the Propel from hours of use). So depending on your knee, hamstring, sciatica, etc., issues, once might feel better than the other after a few hours of use. (unrelated: For bass fishing, the "reverse" gear on the Propel has been very important -- would hate not to have that option.)

FYI -- joel
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have done some research on pedals. The one knock I have heard/read on the Propels is that they have a rust issue in salt water (even the Native fans agree and provide info on how to mitigate it) while with Hobies it's cost and higher likelihood of having to replace fins and other parts. The big knock on all of them is that you pretty much need to launch at ramps if you are battling arm and shoulder issues; they are heavy and awkward to carry. I am still holding out hope I can rehab, but long term I may be looking at a pedal yak. I am building a fiberglass BTB yak that should come in under 50#. I am not sure what the lightest pedal yak is, but I suspect it will be much more than that.
 

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Yes, weight is a serious issue. i recall the Mariner is listed at ca. 80lbs, but with gear it's gotta be over 100lbs. Some people just go ahead and get a trailer. I continue to haul my Mariner on a minivan, and also installed a Yakima Showboat -- so only have to pick up 1/2 the weight of the boat, set it on the roof and roll it on. Works pretty well (and I have back issues) for me.

I have not had the rust issues at all, and have use my Propel in salt multiple times. But I do maintain it pretty conscientiously -- see this thread:
http://www.ncangler.com/forums/thre...el-maintenance-alternative-to-Lubrication-Kit

I've also made my own cart so I don't necessarily have to launch right at the ramp -- but do much prefer a hard surface between vehicle and launch. If I need to drag a yak through the woods, I use my Tarpon 120. My thread on the cart:
http://www.ncangler.com/forums/threads/56905-make-my-own-Kayak-Cart
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The rust issue I read about is behind a plate; the bearings can get some rust and are very difficult to replace once there is rust. I read a thread at the Native site about it and people were proactively replacing the bearing with one designed for salt and/or making sure to get grease in behind it so it was less likely to get rust there and be easier to remove later. These were not people bashing it; there were certainly a few expressing opinions that they should have come this way but most posts were by owners who felt it was worth the effort. Almost anything that goes in the salt needs maintenance.
 

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I don't know if this would help at all but I've built and used traditional-style Innuit paddles for years. The narrow blades take a couple of extra strokes to get going but then are very efficient and easy on the shoulders. Adopting some of the low traditional paddling techniques might be worth a try also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't know if this would help at all but I've built and used traditional-style Innuit paddles for years. The narrow blades take a couple of extra strokes to get going but then are very efficient and easy on the shoulders. Adopting some of the low traditional paddling techniques might be worth a try also.
And you're in Apex. I may get up with you if you can spare a little time...
 

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OptiMystic: just carefully inspected my Propel drive and confirmed no signs of corrosion and no hint of grinding or roughness in the bearings. One can't confidently address very specific problems in a large set of Thingies without a lot of information. But I think one issue is that I've had the inside of the plate in question coated with triple-guard marine grease to prevent the entry of any moisture there (I recall Native recommended petroleum jelly). And I've had this unit in saltwater multiple times over the last year. So some of us with Propel units have seen no hint of this rust/corrosion issue, even after repeated exposure to salt. I have rinsed the unit thoroughly and re-greased the gear more than recommended (they recommend servicing every 6 months) -- I've probably inspected, cleaned and re-greased at least 6-8 times over the last year.

2014-08-04 18_55_18-Photos - Google+.jpg
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
OptiMystic: just carefully inspected my Propel drive and confirmed no signs of corrosion and no hint of grinding or roughness in the bearings. One can't confidently address very specific problems in a large set of Thingies without a lot of information. But I think one issue is that I've had the inside of the plate in question coated with triple-guard marine grease to prevent the entry of any moisture there (I recall Native recommended petroleum jelly). And I've had this unit in saltwater multiple times over the last year. So some of us with Propel units have seen no hint of this rust/corrosion issue, even after repeated exposure to salt. I have rinsed the unit thoroughly and re-greased the gear more than recommended (they recommend servicing every 6 months) -- I've probably inspected, cleaned and re-greased at least 6-8 times over the last year.

View attachment 64531
Bolding and coloring mine. I suspect that first thing you did is largely responsible for your good "luck" in finding a good unit and the second for your continued good fortune. One concern I have is that I could convince myself to do the first and actually follow through, but the second part is pretty unrealistic for me. I am terrible about doing that sort of thing.
 

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I hear you re: maintenance. I'm not normally good about this myself, just gotten a little better about as I've gotten older. Guess I worry more about my "toys" now and making sure they're ready to go and reliable. e.g., I clean, maintain and modify reels more than I ever did when I was young.

Back to body issues: I do find pedaling my yak regularly noticeably helps me back pain and strengthens my core. But, like you already alluded to, I have to be very careful about loading and unloading this beast or I could quickly re-injure my back. I've got a good system for now, but am still planning on rigging up a utility trailer for hauling this big yak around at times.

Good luck with your plans and keep us posted.

// joel
 
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Opti, don't take shoulder surgery lightly. Because the shoulder is a compound joint without great blood circulation, it heals slowly and is very easy to damage for a while after surgery. In my experience, the recovery is much worse than knee surgery.

Fishscalz
 

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You can build a yak and install pedals to mitigate the weight issue.

On that note, I wouldn't run an orbital sander with that arm. Orbital sanders have sent a lot of folks running to the doctor and had no clue that the sander caused the issue. Not uncommon in the boat building community.
Sander's elbow. Anything that vibrates can cause elbow inflammation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Fishscalz,

I am not taking surgery lightly. I researched a bit to find my doctor (Robert Jones, Impact Orthopedics) looking for someone sports oriented (I am not an athlete per se, but I want someone who makes you able to perform again, not just stop hurting) that has a good track record in surgery but doesn't push surgery. With the knee, he said surgery was the only option he could offer me other than signing the DMV form. For the arm, he wants to try PT/rehab extensively first. Surgery would be a last resort.

EvBlue,

I will PM you. I was thinking of trying to get out for a short test paddle this weekend; maybe I could come by and get a little instruction and borrow one. I also have questions about wood choices and what not. I have a small BL log that could be carved into one, but that might be a bit heavy. It would last forever, though.

DR,

So I shouldn't carve that log into a paddle with my sander? :eek: My elbow hasn't been swelling, but he did find fluid in the shoulder. The flare up in the elbow has largely subsided since Friday. I have been wearing the forearm strap and doing things palm up when I can. I did run the angle grinder with a flap disc last night to clean up some ugly epoxy work and I need to cut the frames and rod pod housing pieces. There may be some ibuprofen involved; I can mitigate a little swelling as long as I am not doing anything to aggravate/damage tendons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So Evan (EvBlue) and I went to Harris to try the paddles (he had two in slightly different widths) and see if we could rustle up a few fish. I am not crazy about the Innuit paddles as a full time replacement, but I may make one to use some of the time. It is easier on you but I missed the ability to accelerate quickly. But it didn't seem to be the magic answer.

We did find a few fish; nothing big but no skunks and it was a good outing; got out ahead of the rain and it was warm but not hot.

Thanks Evan; we'll do it again soon...
 
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