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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Calderwood Lake is a narrow deep mountain impoundment that is part in NC and part in TN.

Both states stock it with trout.

In 1998 and 2001 the TWRA stocked lake trout (lake char) into Calderwood. They also stock rainbows.

I believe the NCWRC stocks rainbows and browns into Calderwood.

I am interested in going to Calderwood and fishing for lake trout. I have never caught a lake trout but I see folks catch them on tv. Looks like an exciting fish to catch.

So I sent the TWRA an email to ask if they plan on putting more lake trout into Calderwood Lake. NC residents can fish Calderwood with an NC fishing license.

Here is my email:

Dear Mr Carter,

That does help. I was also wondering if the TWRA had plans to stock more lake trout in Calderwood?

I would like to take my Gheenoe there and fish for them.

Thank you.

Sincerely,


Gambusia



Here is the reply:
No, not at this time. North Carolina did not want us to stock them in their waters.

)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>
Bart Carter


Why would the NCWRC have a problem with lake trout stocking in Calderwood?


 

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Most wildlife departments are getting away from introducing non-native species. Even though it may be thouroughly researched and proven that the lake trout would not be competing for the same resources as the native fish, they tend to balk at such introductions. Many cases exist of an exotic species reeking havoc when introduced into a new environment . One instance that comes to mind is Kudzu. Introduced with the endorsment of the USDA for erosion control, it thrived and became a costly problem. There are so many instances I won't even try to begin a list.
Here is a hypothetical supposition. Suppose you have a long, cold winter and all the rainbows, browns, and lakers gather near the surface to feed on the cold affected shad. At some point the shad (that would have survived) will become much less numerous and the bigger lakers will start to turn to the younger trout for food. Now the fishermen who target the easier to catch trout will be looking at slim prospects for several years. Hatcheries have budgets and can only replace a percentage of them. Pretty soon those people that were trying to help the fishermen become cursed by fishermen for creating a problem. Sometimes agencies get tender after being chewed on. They try to avoid anything that caused them difficulty in the past.
 

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I certainly understand Gambusia's view, but I think that sinkerman's hypo is right on target. Introducing foreign species into native lakes and streams has a cause and effect that will only be known to us in the future. Humans don't always know what they are creating/destroying until it is too late to turn it around. Both of you have provided a very interesting discussion and we will just have to wait and see about the results.
 

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I know where Gambusia is coming from. Many years ago the SC Wildlife Dept. said that when Jocassee Lake backed up they would stock Coho in it. They reversed their descision after a lot of us had gotten our hopes built up. It was areally big let down.... but maybe it was for the best. We will never know how it would have turned out. Some of the local tournament fishermen decided to illegally release spotted bass into the local lakes. They have flourished and handily out compete the largemouth for the smaller baitfish reducing the largemouth population by eating what the largemouth rely on when they are smaller. Some folks like the way it is now and some wish for the way it was before. I say they are better eating and have less mercury than the largemouth. If you don't like them being in the lake, my advice is "If you can't beat'em.... eat'em!" ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
But brown and rainbow trout are non native species already to Calderwood.

I fail to see how stocking lake trout is worse than stocking brown trout??

Maybe the NCWRC thinks the lakers will snack on all their stocked rainbows but the TWRA obviously doesn't agree.

They stock both lakers and rainbows in downstream Chilhowee Lake and rainbows into Calderwood.

You do make good points.
 

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Lakers eat stockers

Calderwood Lake is a narrow deep mountain impoundment that is part in NC and part in TN.

Both states stock it with trout.

In 1998 and 2001 the TWRA stocked lake trout (lake char) into Calderwood. They also stock rainbows.

I believe the NCWRC stocks rainbows and browns into Calderwood.

I am interested in going to Calderwood and fishing for lake trout. I have never caught a lake trout but I see folks catch them on tv. Looks like an exciting fish to catch.

So I sent the TWRA an email to ask if they plan on putting more lake trout into Calderwood Lake. NC residents can fish Calderwood with an NC fishing license.

Here is my email:

Dear Mr Carter,

That does help. I was also wondering if the TWRA had plans to stock more lake trout in Calderwood?

I would like to take my Gheenoe there and fish for them.

Thank you.

Sincerely,


Gambusia



Here is the reply:
No, not at this time. North Carolina did not want us to stock them in their waters.

)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>)>
Bart Carter


Why would the NCWRC have a problem with lake trout stocking in Calderwood?



This is an easy answer! The stocked Rainbows, Browns, and Brookies will get eaten by the Lake Trout. Lake Trout grow very large and prefer to eat other Trout. Lake Sunapee in New Hampshire used to contain a unique subspecies of Brook Trout called Sunapee Trout. Sunapee Trout went extinct after Lake Trout were introduced. Lake Trout grow slow but can live as long as 50 years. Specimens over 100 pounds have been netted in Canada. The record on rod and reel is around 70 pounds.

Tennessee has stocked way more Lakers in Chilhowee Lake and guess what, yeah, Rainbows are getting scarcer and scarcer no matter how many they stock. The Lakers are getting bigger and bigger. I'm positive they are slaughtering the little 'Bows they stock.

If you want to catch a Laker try trolling very, very slow and very deep in the warm months. Use a 3-way swivel. Then put your lure, a simple spoon will suffice about 6 feet back. Then, use the swivels other leg for a sinker. Put a snap on the weight lineand use about 4 foot of line. Then you can change weights very easily. Use bell sinkers. 1/2 ounce should get you 10-15 feet down. That would work fine in winter and maybe the first month of spring. 1 ounce should get you 20-25 feet down. 2 ounces 40-45 feet. Calderwood is so deep that in the heat of summer 2.5-3 ounces could be necessary. I never g.o over 2 ounces in Chilhowee. I have not trolled Calderwood for Lakers yet. I will as soon as U.S. 129 is fully open.

Fish the bottom half, nearer the dam, for the Lakers. In Tennessee it's legal to use small 'Bows for bait. I don't do this but I know somebody who does. He says a 6 inch 'Bow is perfect. I troll.....one of these days I expect to catch one over 10 pounds. The Tennessee record is over 20 pounds from Watagua Lake.

Lake Trout are cannibal's cannibals. They'll eat small Lakers or any other soft skinned fishes will do, such as Rainbows and Brookies. Lakers, unlike other Trout, will not feed at night. Troll for 'em early or late day....remember, S-L-O-W and D-E-E-P.
 

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Using trout for bait is legal in NC too.

I'd rather catch a 24 pound laker than a 12 inch rainbow any day of the week.
It used to be illegal to use any Game Fish as bait in Tennessee. That's no longer the case. I'm not sure when that changed but it has. One man told me fished in the Smoky Park for 6" Trout to use as bait. It's only a matter of time before somebody catches a 24 pound Laker from one of the lakes they've been stocked in.
 
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