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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fished a creek east of Washington. Zilch for trout, they've moved from where I found them two weeks ago. I started at first light and fished until noon.

I did find a 13 and 17" flounder. I caught both of those on a space guppy z man jerk shad scented with procure.

Slow morning, but pretty day on the water.


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Back, way back, that's where they were last time I fished. Hung a few that day. Seem to have moved . I spent too much time fishing. "Last weeks spot"

Should've gotten mobile



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Red X Angler
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we just had a big push of fresh water run off and warmer weather,it moved them out of the wayyy back creeks...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah, I have problems finding them when they move toward the river. That's when you need to understand structure and places that hold fish. I'm not good at that.


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Same thing here yesterday two weeks ago we got aboit 30
spikes yesterday same spots not one found. Only two tiny croaker and a short flounder.

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Red X Angler
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Visuals: stumps docks any kind of structure. Dpethfinder, structure, humps, holes. Anywhere bait can hide or passing bait can be ambushed is a good place to try. Finding subtle cues where there is no obvious visual is a learned thing. Watching the shoreline for how it approaches the water ex: drops quickly. drops gradually. has drainage, or what it consists of ex: sand, grass, rocks.. Watching bait movement. Knowing what to ignore. ex: Jumping mullet will jump around for no reason, they aren't usually being chased by something. A lot of the top water movement you see around Washington is Gar. Identify quickly and move on. When I first moved here I chased both the jumping mullet ( thinking it was escaping from larger fish), and the Gar, (thinking it might be stripers or reds.)
Also remember that in the Washington area and anywhere the boundaries for fresh/salt are very close, any rains inland for the Tar river are coming this way in a big push of fresh water. This will either push them downriver or at least make them go dormant to use the salt they have in their systems to tolerate the fresh imbalance until it passes. This time of year we also have trout who have wintered in far backwaters are now coming out of hiding to feed and spawn and are seeking better quality water and food so they are moving out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks sun drop, I'm definite guilty of chasing mullet and (probably) gar. I always associate a lot of topwater activity with fish I want to catch.

That being said, I did have lots of luck locating stripers in the fall/winter by looking for topwater feeding in known "rock holes" and throwing topwater lures at them.

I guess tactics need to change with the seasons. Not as much mullet/gar activity in the winter?


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Gar are usually pretty easy to distinguish. When you see them on top its usually a pretty lazy affair and they are normally not moving fast or making a lot of noise. A trout, drum, or striper are usually much more violent when they are feeding on top.
 
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