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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let me start off by saying I have a LoadRite Delux Trailer for a 16X48 Alumacraft jon boat with a 20hp Tohatsu motor.

I am running 4.80 X 12 inch Load Star (Class C) tires which are rated for 990 lbs with inflation at 90 psi. All this, as you know, is on the tire.

I checked both tires today because I am heading out this weekend and one was at 50 psi while the other was at 70 psa.

I know you usually dont inflate car and truck tires to the amount listed on the tire, but even the tire at 70 psi was way off.

So I called where I got my trailer. After a meeting of the minds the concensus was....." we normally dont let trailer tires out of here with more than 50 psi." HUH? One was at 70 psi and it wasnt me that made it so.

I did a little phone search and called another boat dealer and they essentially said the same thing. Based on my boat and motor.....50 psi.

I wasnt still feeling a great warm and fuzzy so I tired calling LoadRite themselves. WALL!! They dont answer those kind of questions....phone a dealer.

Then I saw a warranty phone number on the tire and figured what the heck, give it a try. Got a young guy who was very confident and forcefull to inflate the tire to the full 90 psi. He was convinced 90 psi was the way to go.

Ok, so what to do. I decided to go with 70 psi and watch the one tire real carefully that was showing 50 psi and see if it starts to go down. I have a spare and it is holding at 70 psi so Im not up the creek if the one goes.....of course unless it takes the boat with it.

To what psi would you inflate??
 

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The PSI on the tire is the max. Just like a car tire. You do not have to run it at the max. You really want to find the correct pressure for the load. The tire should have good contact with the road without mushrooming. Bringing the tires up to 90 will make them hard and not provide any shock assistance. Think about a wheelbarrow tire.

You should look at both tires with the boat loaded for travel. Which looks more correctly inflated? Make the other tire equal to that one. Then you can pay attention to the one for a leak and both for quality of ride. Make adjustments as necessary.

mike
 

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if they are rated for 90 psi I would run close to that checked with the tire hot from driving. Start with 70 and get em hot. Biggest concern as has been said is good tread contact with little ballooning of the sidewalls.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
One thing I just remembered is that there is a tag UNDER the boat with various data. I bent my old creeky knees and found it said put 60 psi . I had already put 70 psi and will keep an eye on them.....especially the one that may be leaking. When you think about it....3 different sources. ...3 different answers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Trailer is less than year old....probably less than 1000 miles on it....I got it new. All original.
 

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Most tires EXCEPT BIG 10 PLY tires will be two thirds of max rating for proper inflation. 60 to 70 sound right for that tire just adjust it to your best ride and fuel mileage. Yes proper tire inflation will effect fuel mileage SIGNIGICANTLY.


Gene - RED >X< - Asheboro
 

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The max rating on a tire is for max load and it should be measured cold. Most tires even specify to measure cold. The tires are designed to run at max inflation for top performance. Under inflation not only causes poor mileage, it also heats up the sidewall reducing its lifespan and causes uneven tread wear which is witnessed by both outside edges of the tread wearing while the center does not. The only time I would not run tires at rated pressure is when they have sun rot or tread damage. Of course them I am only running them to the tire store.
 

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Depends upon what type of tire you have on your boat trailer. Special trailer tires like those on my popup camper need to be inflated to the max PSI or close to it to remain rigid and be able to handle the full amount of weight they are rated for. Underinflation will cause the tire to ride on the sidewalls causing the tire to separate and shred. I found this out the hard way the first month I had my camper.
 
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