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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was down at a boat store the other day looking at battery quick disconnects. I want to put some on my trolling motor so when I take it off I dont have to mess with the battery every time.

It seems to me that the wire on the quick disconnects is a good bit smaller than the wire on the trolling motor.

Is that a problem? Cause any damage to motor or battery?

Anyone have experience ?
 

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Sometimes the wire on the quick disconnects are "Tinned" wire and those will carry more current at a small wire diameter. Trolling motor wire is usually just copper wire and needs to be of a larger gauge, to handle the same current load. But depending on the distance from the battery, I would think the quick disconnect should handle the current load.
 

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The only advantage to a tinned wire is that the copper doesn't corrode From exposure to moisture in the air which in turns keeps the copper efficient in supplying voltage and the amperage it's sized for. Tinned wire is a marine thing. It's what you wire boats with.....or should.

I'll tell you from experience. The wire that comes in a boat for a trolling motor may be incorrectly sized. I've also seen solid wire used....from the factory.
When you look at a DC voltage drop table it'll make you rethink the whole wiring thing. DC drops off bad fast. A lot of boats are wired incorrectly which cuts down on the efficiency you get out of your battery bank.
 

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The only advantage to a tinned wire is that the copper doesn't corrode From exposure to moisture in the air which in turns keeps the copper efficient in supplying voltage and the amperage it's sized for. Tinned wire is a marine thing. It's what you wire boats with.....or should.

I'll tell you from experience. The wire that comes in a boat for a trolling motor may be incorrectly sized. I've also seen solid wire used....from the factory.
When you look at a DC voltage drop table it'll make you rethink the whole wiring thing. DC drops off bad fast. A lot of boats are wired incorrectly which cuts down on the efficiency you get out of your battery bank.
You are absolutely correct!!! Tinned wire and current carrying capacity have nothing to do with each other. Tinned wire is just a corrosion thing. Voltage drop applies to DC as well as AC....lol.
 

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I learned through messing with and around boats that just because somebody makes it doesn't mean it's right.
Fantastic examples of that can be found in the electrical rigging components.
Navigation lights being a huge example.
Too often people just think of a bow light as something they have to have so they don't get a ticket. They don't think about that light saving their life or someone's else's. There is a 2 mile visibility regulation on your read and green. That also means that at 2 miles you be able to tell it's a red light or a green light. Not a white light and a blue light. I'd dare to say most of what is marketed in nav lighting for small boats does not meet minimum requirements. You have to drop substantially more than 20 bucks to get nav lights that will actually pass muster.

So just because somebody sells a plug with 6" of number 10 stranded wire as a pigtail......doesn't make it right. It will probably work in most situations but it's not going to be as efficient as it should be. It may not be suitable for long run times. But last, just because somebody makes it, and a manufacturer or dealer screws it to your boat doesn't make it legal or take the responsibility off you.
Responsibility goes to the captain of the vessel. Captains get ticketed, not dealers or manufacturers.

Be Aware.
 

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Understanding your concern and desires to the best of my ability, and assuming this is not a metal boat. Do not try the following on a metal boat. Find 2 stainless bolts long enough to run through your deck, drill holes just large enough for those bolts Secure ring lugs (the type used on car batteries) on heavy gauge wires and run the bolt through the rings. Put a stainless fender washer on the bolt then push it through the deck, put some sealant around the hold and put a fender washer on top of the deck, then use a stainless nut to secure the bolt to the deck. Put similar rings on the trolling motor power wire and secure it to the bolt with a stainless wing nut.
If this write up confused you as much as it did me. From the bottom to the top: Stainless bolt, wire lug, fender washer, boat deck, sealant, fender washer, nut, trolling wire lug, wing nut. Do it again with the negative wire a few inches away and do not forget which is positive. Etch the washers if you need to. Also do not skimp on the hardware, buy stainless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Understanding your concern and desires to the best of my ability, and assuming this is not a metal boat. Do not try the following on a metal boat. Find 2 stainless bolts long enough to run through your deck, drill holes just large enough for those bolts Secure ring lugs (the type used on car batteries) on heavy gauge wires and run the bolt through the rings. Put a stainless fender washer on the bolt then push it through the deck, put some sealant around the hold and put a fender washer on top of the deck, then use a stainless nut to secure the bolt to the deck. Put similar rings on the trolling motor power wire and secure it to the bolt with a stainless wing nut.
If this write up confused you as much as it did me. From the bottom to the top: Stainless bolt, wire lug, fender washer, boat deck, sealant, fender washer, nut, trolling wire lug, wing nut. Do it again with the negative wire a few inches away and do not forget which is positive. Etch the washers if you need to. Also do not skimp on the hardware, buy stainless.
Yep...aluminum boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'll second that. The nickel plated connectors hold up great to the salt.
I think the above may be a bit overkill...but ....

I have a Minn Kota 40lb thrust trolling motor.....an aluminum jon boat....and was wondering if the two wire plug in adapters sold at most boat stores I have been in worked.

Seems to be some strong opinions on this issue which is good to soak up. I am just trying to come up with a way to take the trolling motor off and put in the hotel room when out and about without having to open the battery box and wrench the connectors off only to wrench them back on the next morning.
 

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The marineco are definitely the best. The are the same style that are used for three phase restaurant equipment. Also with wire sizing find a good voltage drop table realizing it is the minimum recommend wire size for the voltage drop at that distance. So if you are right on the border line always go up a size. Always use stranded wire and don't even consider aluminum. Remember that wire is a lot cheaper than buying new electronics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The marineco are definitely the best. The are the same style that are used for three phase restaurant equipment. Also with wire sizing find a good voltage drop table realizing it is the minimum recommend wire size for the voltage drop at that distance. So if you are right on the border line always go up a size. Always use stranded wire and don't even consider aluminum. Remember that wire is a lot cheaper than buying new electronics.
If I understand it, I am getting a two wire male plug and a receptacle and will basically just cut the existing wires ...skin them back . ..insert in plug and receptacle. ...tighten screws....and Im done.
 

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If you go that route pick up some pure silicone dielectric grease and coat all the connections and the male plug as well. This will help to keep as much water and thus corrosion at bay as you can.
 

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Here's what I do for a quick connect. I have an old aluminum boat with a side console. I have the main power cable from the stern battery go to the console, which has a junction and fuse panel inside. From the fuse panel and junction, the lights and sonar are rigged. For a trolling motor I got a stern mount Minn Kota from walmart - but I disconnected the top unit and flipped it, and reattached so it can be a bow mount. This clamps on to a block of wood mounted on the bow of my boat. I cut the battery leads from the Minn Kota and spliced a three prong female power receptacle. I then got an outdoor extension cord and cut off about 3 feet and spliced it into the boat's console. And hanging off that is the three prong plug that was original to the extension cord. This plugs into the female counterpart attached to the trolling motor. Works great and when I get home I just unplug the motor from the extension cord and store it in the garage.

This may give an electrician a heart attack but sometimes all you need is a little hillbilly engineering.
 
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