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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!

We recently moved to Wrightsville and want to get into harvesting "oysters." I've been doing some research but didn't know if anyone has first hand knowledge/advice they'd be willing to share. We have Kayaks and I found the "closed" areas so I'm basically planning on just kayaking around in "open" areas where harvesting shellfish is legal. Behind figure 8 island look promising so might give that a shot first. In terms of actually harvesting the oysters. can you just pluck them - or do you need something a little more heavy duty (i.e. hammer/chisel). Once I get some yall should come over for a oyster grilling party hahaha anyway I appreciate the advice!
 

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I have gotten my own oysters a handful of times. It depends on where you get them but for the most part it can be a dirty job. The marshes I get them from can be a little soft so a pair of waders is essential. Also a good pair of thick rubber gloves. A small hammer is also important to have. The smallest size oyster you are allowed to keep is 3"s so use that hammer to lightly hit off the smaller ones from clusters. The area I like to go is closer to an inlet for they are a bit cleaner and I wait for low tide. I like to look at tidal ponds that the tide has gone out on and dried up (thus the soft bottom I mentioned earlier) and look for oysters who are just barely sticking out of the mud/sand. If the oyster is already open, dont pick that one. It really is rather rewarding picking your own and when you invite people over for an oyster roast you'd be surprised how impressed they are when they hear you got them. Best of luck and enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have gotten my own oysters a handful of times. It depends on where you get them but for the most part it can be a dirty job. The marshes I get them from can be a little soft so a pair of waders is essential. Also a good pair of thick rubber gloves. A small hammer is also important to have. The smallest size oyster you are allowed to keep is 3"s so use that hammer to lightly hit off the smaller ones from clusters. The area I like to go is closer to an inlet for they are a bit cleaner and I wait for low tide. I like to look at tidal ponds that the tide has gone out on and dried up (thus the soft bottom I mentioned earlier) and look for oysters who are just barely sticking out of the mud/sand. If the oyster is already open, dont pick that one. It really is rather rewarding picking your own and when you invite people over for an oyster roast you'd be surprised how impressed they are when they hear you got them. Best of luck and enjoy!

Wow, that's awesome - thanks theramrod! Really appreciate you sharing your knowledge! I'll post some pics after I attempt to do a little harvesting! Thanks man! And yes I love cooking what I catch/harvest - not many things more satisfying!
 

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Go to Lowes and get a cheap pry bar and a pair of Kevlar gloves. You'll also need a pair of tossable shoes as they'll be trashed when your done. You may want to get a claw rake while at Lowes if you like clams. You can find them in firmer transition zone between the sand and mud. I usually pull the rake while pressing firmly until I feel them scream... Lol They make a distinctive sound when the tines of the rake go across them. Like a scream. Usually if you find one there'll be more. Remember they have size and qty limits.
 

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If you didn’t already know about it, here’s an interactive map with open/closed areas. Keep an eye on it, if there’s any rain or other event that could affect the water quality they will close an area off that is normally not closed. ArcGIS Web Application
Well I'll be switched! I'm backed up to Styron Creek in Sealevel and wouldn't you know it, I've been red flagged :mad:
Thanks anyway for the link. That's going to be useful, I reckon.
 

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Most permanent closures make sense due to their location/proximity to large amounts of runoff. Styron Creek however seems a little silly to me.
We have a lot of oyster farms in this area. Perhaps most of the creeks and waterways have been flagged for that purpose. I know the guy that runs a oyster / clam hatchery close by. I'll ask him if he knows... and I'm sure that he does.
 
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