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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So far it appears that she will make a right hook and head our way. It appears that by Tuesday it will be half way up Florida and a hurricane. My question is how does that effect the inland fishing? Does the bite depend on the individual bands or more of a concern when the main storm hits? How does one go about planning to fish around the event or next weekend when it would likely be over the state?
 

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Red X Angler
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To hard to make a real call but in general it depends on how it wobbles and where it goes. It may come up through SC and pour rain in Raleigh and barely stir mud on the beach or it may dump on the whole state. I've also seen them drift back to sea and regain strength. Too many variables to make a solid call. Generally fish lock down when there is an extreme drop in barometric pressure. Before the drop and a day after they will be hungry, both planning ahead as they sense the change and feeding after the "fasting period". This is also species specific as some species are more tolerant than others. Then you also have to consider rain, water rising, water quality from muddy run off and stagnant purging of swamp waters etc etc. I say plan loosely and watch the weather..
 
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Red X Angler
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If it's heading up towards your area, often fish will feed well before an approaching storm in response to the dropping pressure. Otherwise, be safe, help out with cleanup, and then fish the conditions you're dealt the same way you do with any other rain event.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I get anything can happen, for purpose of the discussion lets assume everybody is safe because that is obviously more important. I get other people have other prep issues, being in the Piedmont I don't have many and if I need it, wearing out my knees would be a better use of my time.

I have not studied the pressure as the storm approaches with regards to the bands, do they have the same effect as normal storms and main issue is when the eye approaches or is it that the bands are similar to the a larger pressure drop because that is what is pushing the bands out? I ask as people on here go back and further about the pressure from a normal storm but I think we can agree a TS/Hurricane is not a normal weather event so to speak so I am curious if the rules are a little different then a weather event.
 

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Red X Angler
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the bands of rain are not related to the drops in pressure. The drop in pressure is related to how close the eye approaches. In the eye is the lowest pressure of the storm. The bands of rain do however come with the winds and possible tornadic activity and that is dangerous..
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A strong hurricane usually reeks havoc on the freshwater river system for a few years. The flooding combined with depleted oxygen levels usually causes a massive fish kill.
That's not good.

Question, what causes the depleted oxygen levels? I can see the flooding bringing in fish toxic chemicals from runoff but you have less concentration with more water. I guess a plus fish wise, they can get new structures in the habitat.
 

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Red X Angler
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more prevalent in low lying, swampy tributaries, but what you get is all that green nasty "dead" water you see in swamps and the very back of stagnant creeks. That water is full of bad bacteria, low oxygen, chemicals and other funk from mankind and nature. A big rain flushes all of that out into the populated waters and can cause serious fish kills and bacterial contaminations. Heaven forbid if you add to this livestock waste, industrial slurry, and human waste drainage that may have failed or over flowed from heavy rains..
 

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We had Floyd and Fran that plowed through NC. Both caused major flooding.

Fran blew right through the coast and dumped a ton of rain inland. Jordan was way high. I hunted the woods in the area later that fall. The water was still feet up and into the woods. it messed with fishing the rest of the fall. And then with all the trees down and flooding. The deer were scattered and on new paths. It took years to get back to normal in the woods.

Floyd dumped a ton of rain at the coast and did not really effect anything past I95. Water was still coming out of NC a couple weeks later. Roads were flooded all the way to Kinston.

Basically, if your in the path you can forget fishing for some days. Even though the weather sure is nice on the other side. And the eye is a lovely place to be until it finishes going over you.

mike
 

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Mmmm... Floyd.... I lived in Charleston when that one came through, and the morning before we packed up and left town we had the single best day of surfing I ever experienced in my life on Folly Beach. Huge slow rolling waves in regular sets with long lines, easily 7 to 9 feet, got the longest ride I've ever had on a surfboard - from 10th street down past 6th street by the time I was done.

Sorry. Little trip on memory lane. Nothing to do with fishing. Carry on.
 

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Fisk kills with TS's or hurricanes only happen in the coastal plain. Piedmont rivers dont usually have kills I guess other than it might kill off some of the new fry. The haw during Fran was the seconds highest I have ever seen it. soon as it was back down fishing was good.
 

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I went to a golf outing in Havlock a little over a week after Floyd. We did get to golf. We had to take some detours to get there from Cary and about the Havlock area. The golf courses should not have been open. Kinda squishy in low areas.

mike
 

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A strong hurricane usually reeks havoc on the freshwater river system for a few years. The flooding combined with depleted oxygen levels usually causes a massive fish kill.
As hurricane Irene which devastated the Roanoke Basin and most of E N C. We are still seeing the after effects; the fish kill was extensive and it takes several years to stabilize again. B-
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Looks like it's looking a bit better for us.
Isn't that worse for us. On that plotted path to storm will hit the Apps and stay on the east/south side of the mnt range. The entire state gets slammed with more areas on the right (bad) side. Always seems to be the case with winter storms.

None of the these paths look good for us. Except for the button hook in FL, then it really sucks to be them.
 
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