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If anyone runs across a tunnel hull aluminum boat, point me to it. I'm looking. Thanks.

Wtb: prop tunnel preferred, jet tunnel ok
40-90hp main power
fishing deck w trolling motor preferred
16' minimum
Beat up ok, no rivets, all weld only
Side console preferred, center ok, no tiller drive

want to fish around the house so I don't have to drive an hour every time just to get to decent water.
 

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Jab - shame you're not on the South Texas Gulf Coast... tunnel hulls are a dime a dozen down there (I just relocated from there). Lots of skinny water there and they're perfect for running it. I sold my boat before moving to NC, but in the next few months I'll be driving back down with the intent to drag a brand new tunnel hull back to NC with me.
 

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Red X Angler
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lots of tunnels hulls run the Dan, Staunton, and James....keep an eye on craigslist in Danville, Lynchburg , Richmond etc....
 

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Red X Angler
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Educate me please... what does it mean 'tunnel hull'?

EDIT:
Never mind, looked it up, and I guess I get the difference but not sure how that's different than a bi-hull or catamaran style hull.
 

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They aren't talking about a full tunnel.
Just a tunnel in the rear. It raises the water column as it comes out of the back of the boat allowing you to run the engine higher.
To run the engine higher you need the water there for cooling the engine.

There is some science behind these tunnels. Typically in an aluminum boat you just see a squared off tunnel pretty much.
Get into the wood and glass boats the tunnel designs have more engineering backing them up with shape. Shape that efficiently harnesses the water and shapes the column which allows more radical engine heights and even altering the cooling intake on some engines to allow for the additional height. The whole purpose is to run skinny.

It will have an effect on boat handling though. Put a tunnel on some hulls and they get flip prone.

One of the more radical setups. Notice how high that motor is jackplated.
http://www.maverickboats.com/boats/mirage-17-hpx-tunnel/
 

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How come they just don't run a jet tunnel on the flats? Grass clogging the intake and sand eating up the blades? Would a prop that high up still get them up on plane quicker than a jet? Does the jackplate allow them to drop back down once they hit deeper water?
 

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Some do run jets but you'll get better performance and handling with a prop. Especially low speed.
As far as getting on plane most of these type boats are flat bottom or near flat bottom skiffs. Sitting still, they are essentially on plane. In other words, you don't have to get the hull up out of the water or on the pad. They pretty much sit at the same attitude they run at.
These boats are designed and BUILT specifically for this whereas an aluminum boat as example has a tunnel as an after thought. An option.

You ever seen a propped boat go over a sand bar? These setups can. You make a run at the dry sand bar, as you draw close you drop the power all the way off, wait for the wake to over take the hull and float across what was once a dry sandbar adding power as necessary.
It's all in the timing.

It's a pretty extreme form of fishing especially in south Florida and West coast Florida where you have miles and miles of flats
I used to converse with a guy who builds his own boats in Florida right regular. Plywood, glass, and epoxy. Really nice flats boats.
He left the dock one morning and 3 miles out hit a mangrove stump running 45mph. Jerked the stump out of the bottom of the sea bed. He drove back to the ramp. That stump drove up through the bottom of the boat and stopped before it came through the floor. I saw the pictures. The stump was still hanging out of the bottom of the boat.
He had poured the hull full of foam so he didn't take on any water. Foam displaces water.

Pulled the boat home and repaired it.

Cost wise, a true flats boat will set you back quite a bit especially the radically powered ones.
You could build a 20x8 flats boat for around 10 grand including new engine. It's just not going to have speed but will have the skinny performance. Start looking at boats like the Hells Bay and you are looking at 30-50,000 for a 15-16 foot narrow beam boat with a 70 mph capability in inches of water. It's a different world down there.

When it gets to the point you are incorporating carbon fiber fabrics and laying Kevlar on the inside of your hull to keep objects from coming through the boat and potentially impaling occupants, you are getting serious with it and slinging money around.
Heck, 6oz hybrid Kevlar 50 " wide which aint much protection is about 40 bucks a running yard. They are using something in the neighborhood of 12 -17 ounce.
 

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I had no idea a flats boat could go north of 30K! The ride must be rough when the chop gets up.

Do you know about these? http://www.hogislandboatworks.com/skiff_specifications.php
Seems like if built with a jet tunnel hull and changing the floor plan they might make a fine river boat vs. aluminum jet. Not sure how they react to a rock strike.

I really want a purpose built poly bottom aluminum 16 ft. river jet someday maybe one of these http://www.newsadvance.com/news/loc...cle_2317bb60-ce7d-11e3-ab60-0017a43b2370.html , but the thing that bothers me is taking turns and sliding or spinning out, but I guess you learn to handle it.

I imagine a few guys have mistimed that trick on sandbars and got pretty stuck high and dry.
 

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Not familiar with them.
I'm just not a fan of jets. They have their place which is probably in a rocky setting you are talking about. undoubtedly the best option for you.
But yes, tunnels and jets can both have an impact on handling. As with anything though you can be somewhat conservative in how you go about something or radical to the extreme. Knowing your water is key.
 

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Shape has a lot to do with it. Size could be influenced by other things like handling or hull shape and type.
Probably 8 years ago on a boat building website, there was a builder determined to put a tunnel on a boat he was building. The designer of the boat strongly advised him not to.
Long story short he launched his boat for the first time, went tooling across bay, made a turn and the boat rolled right over.

There is more to a tunnel than what most people think. A tunnel that performs well that is.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Fwiw, I'm looking a boat that was designed for the tunnel, not one that had one cut into it after. Main use for skimming sandbars but occasional hits of wood and rock are expected. So def aluminum, and def not 30+, although I have seen a few brands a bit over 30 that are sweet...
 
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