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Red X Angler
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For starters, let me apologize for the poor photo (was taken with my iPhone) What you are supposed to be looking at is a shell/sandy shoreline

Trigger and I had this discussion a few weeks back. I totally understand that all of the times I have fished these shorelines fish may not have been present/not hungry, or, I just do not understand the area and need to edumacate myself.

The grasslines almost always produce fish during incoming high/high/outgoing high, no worries. I am drawn to this shell/sandy area because.......I never see anyone else fishing it. So why not give it a college try?

So far I have not managed anymore than a short strike on top water. Popping corks/suspend baits and bucktails have yet to produce anything that resembles a strike. The only thing I have yet to try is live/cut baits.

My interest in fishing these areas are because of what I previously mentioned, no one else fishes these shorelines, they motor right past them. My mindset is they are not being hammered by fisherman, run over there and load up :)

I work the shell/sand shorelines for a couple hours and then call it quits after being skunked. Power up and head to the grasslines/creeks.

Any suggestions?

Rick

shoreline.jpg
 

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The water there is very shallow with very little structure. Fish want a hole, cut, etc, to hide in out of the current and ambush bait. Just like in a brackish creek I fish sometime. 90% of the creek is totally flat bottom about 4-5 deep. I don't even bother to troll from my yak because my confidence in those flat areas is non existant. I head straight for structure and depth changes and fish.
 

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Red X Angler
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The water there is very shallow with very little structure. Fish want a hole, cut, etc, to hide in out of the current and ambush bait. Just like in a brackish creek I fish sometime. 90% of the creek is totally flat bottom about 4-5 deep. I don't even bother to troll from my yak because my confidence in those flat areas is non existant. I head straight for structure and depth changes and fish.
Well, not so much at high tide. 50' off shore you're in 2-4' of water. It is true, I have yet to find any structure around, but the bottom is quite littered with shell.
During high tide you can watch bait fish scatter but other than that, nothing.
Could very well be a waste of time fishing this area but I always have to convince myself of it first :)
 

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Try to look for the drop off further off the shoreline. that shallow there is a ridge line there that will hold cruisers.
 

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there's probably a reason no one's fishing that shoreline and your not catching anything.... IMO it doesn't look like a very fishy spot. I'd look for a point or bay near this area. ledges drop off's and points are typical places i focus on... long flat shallow bank lines like the one pictured never do much for me.
 

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Red X Angler
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
there's probably a reason no one's fishing that shoreline and your not catching anything.... IMO it doesn't look like a very fishy spot. I'd look for a point or bay near this area. ledges drop off's and points are typical places i focus on... long flat shallow bank lines like the one pictured never do much for me.
I pretty much have the area mapped out for depths and the first sight of any "real drop off" is in the channel itself, that said the same applies to the grassy areas as well.
So I'll continue to make my check list of areas that do produce and those that do not. Who knows, maybe I can crack the code to this area and land fish :)
 

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Just ask yourself, "Why would a fish want to be there?" Fish are not all that smart, if you can't think of a good reason to be there, I can assure you a fish cannot either. Good Luck.
 

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It is said that 10 percent of the water holds most of the fish. Why you ask? Structure, cover, depth, food supply all fall into play. Sometimes a place like that does hold fish, but I would cast out into deeper water.

If you are not catching anything in the same spot, over and over and over and over and over and over, why continue to beat a dead horse to death. Move on and use that time to find and explore new fishing areas. Find those that produce in one place and that will usually produce in other similar areas.
 

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Red X Angler
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It is said that 10 percent of the water holds most of the fish. Why you ask? Structure, cover, depth, food supply all fall into play. Sometimes a place like that does hold fish, but I would cast out into deeper water.

If you are not catching anything in the same spot, over and over and over and over and over and over, why continue to beat a dead horse to death. Move on and use that time to find and explore new fishing areas. Find those that produce in one place and that will usually produce in other similar areas.
The shoreline in question is probably close to one mile in length (guesstimating). I have yet to hit the same area twice while fishing that shoreline. I'll work a couple hundred yards of shoreline and move to a creek/marsh. Later I may revisit that shoreline but further down all the while watching my depth finder looking for drop offs/structure.
My last three visits to that particular shoreline may have me having covered roughly half of it. From the sounds of things it may be time to move on :)
 

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I don't see anything in that picture that would hold bait. That's the key. If there was an oyster bar just under the surface, a couple of sunken pilings, or any other thing that would break the current and hold bait, it is always worth a half-dozen casts to check it out. What I'm seeing isn't worth stopping for.
 

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Red X Angler
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if it is shell bottom not sand, flounder will not lay there. Reds and trout have no point from which to ambush and the area is too open to chase bait successfully. No one wants to work hard for a meal.. Ease up as close as you can then ease away from shore watching your depth and look for holes/drops/ channels from this flat and that is where you may find fish as the tide drops and pulls the minnows/crabs off the flat.. I will often drive all across a fishing area just to "map" it even though I spook what may be there. If it was laid out right it will have fish at other times and is worth knowing about, and if it is wrong, I will not waste more time wondering..
 
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Red X Angler
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
if it is shell bottom not sand, flounder will not lay there. Reds and trout have no point from which to ambush and the area is too open to chase bait successfully. No one wants to work hard for a meal.. Ease up as close as you can then ease away from shore watching your depth and look for holes/drops/ channels from this flat and that is where you may find fish as the tide drops and pulls the minnows/crabs off the flat.. I will often drive all across a fishing area just to "map" it even though I spook what may be there. If it was laid out right it will have fish at other times and is worth knowing about, and if it is wrong, I will not waste more time wondering..
For the most part what I've been doing so far. Again to clarify, I was simply scouting the area, I have never spent more than a couple hours mapping it out. I have the drops marked. Maybe one day when things are slow I'll fish those drops and see if they yield fish. One never knows :)
 

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Have you gone back there at slack water low tide? Is there a lip in front of the path? Are there any openings to the marsh in the background. If so I would try that spot after the flood tide as bait fish are being washed out. You said there is bait fish in the area. At low tied would it be easier to feed on them or do you still 50' of 2-4' high water perpendicular to the shore/path? If not there, where are the clam shells coming from?
 

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Red X Angler
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Have you gone back there at slack water low tide? Is there a lip in front of the path? Are there any openings to the marsh in the background. If so I would try that spot after the flood tide as bait fish are being washed out. You said there is bait fish in the area. At low tied would it be easier to feed on them or do you still 50' of 2-4' high water perpendicular to the shore/path? If not there, where are the clam shells coming from?
There is an opening to the marsh a few hundred yards up that I fish regularly most of the time landing fish. At slack low tide you still have at least 50' until you reach the channel drop off. If I can keep from being pummeled by jet skiers and 80' yachts I would give it a shot because you go from 4' to 8' within a few feet
 
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