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I wanted to start a couple of threads describing some new tackle/techniques that have been mentioned recently. Thought this would make for an easy way to search...

Here's my shot:
Freestyle jigging appears to be a freshwater version of "Butterfly Jigging". "Freestyle" may be the Bass Pro Shops name for the same tackle & tactic. These are long thin vertical jigging spoons, similar to diamond jigs but the difference is in the the way the hooks work. Instead of a treble hook, the freestyle & butterfly jigs typically have 2 single hooks connected to the jig by a flexible wire. The pics I've seen have the hooks hanging from the head of the jig body, at the same place the line is connected. The dual separate hooks and flexible wire make for a lure that is often connected to the fish in 2 places and much harder for the fish to gain leverage against the jig, which is cause of frequent lost fish with traditional jigging spoons.

Freshwater versions range from 1/4oz to 1oz
Saltwater versions range from 2 to 9 ounces, 3.75 to 6 inches long. Very good for very deep jigging as the lure gets down fast.

There is a line of Shimano Butterfly jigging rods which are built specifically for this technique.

Here's a couple links to reports/blogs where this lure/technique has been used:
Topsail Angler - Offshore Butterfly Jigging
Zooker - High Rock Freestyle Jigging
Butterfly jigging video from the Tex's Tackle team

(Feel free to chime in, correct, enhance...)

Here's a couple pics:
 

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Actually freestyle jigging refers to a style of fishing using elongated metal jigs fished vertically or angle vertically (like drifting or casting away from the boat but allowing the jig to drop before you retrieve), in salt or fresh water. Shimano applied the name Butterfly Jigging to their line of freestyle jigging products and trademarked the name.

It is a technique that was developed in Japan in the 90's for targeting Bluefin Tuna and other deep water critters. Then adapted for use in shallower water too. It began catching on in the USA first on the west coast a few years back and now on the east coast. It is now being adapted by freshwater anglers as well.

I have been studying and practicing this technique for a year or so and I am far from being an expert but will share what I know. It is a blast!

More later, gotta run off now to an appointment.
 

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Design appears to made in such a way that the weight of the jig is usually within the mouth of the fish so it doesnt act as a pendulum to help throw the hook....
 
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The line attaches to a solid ring, the free swinging hook(s) also attach to this ring. A separate split ring is used to attach the jig to the solid ring. The effect is the same as if the hook was tied direct to the line with no lure in between. Thus when the fish strikes (usually at the eyes near the top where the hooks are) the jig hangs off to the side of the fish's mouth. You are right Sundrop in that it doesn't act a pry bar or lever, so the fish is less likely to pull the hook.
 

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Do these type of jigs get hung up much?? I see exposed hooks and think that they would be easily lost.
 
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Do these type of jigs get hung up much?? I see exposed hooks and think that they would be easily lost.
Great question!

Actually just the opposite. I have yet to lose one to a snag in over a year of fishing with them, which is good cause those Shimano's are expensive. When I get snagged, I relax the line and because the hook is attached above the jig, the weight of the jig pulls the hooks down and out. A few times I have had to "bounce" the weight up and down a bit but so far so good!

It might be a bit more of a problem in freshwater with the lighter jigs but I don't think anymore so than with other types of jigs.
 

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there's a ring at both ends of the jig - if the top one attaches to the split ring with the hooks & line, what's the bottom one for?
I suppose it is there so you could attach a hook at the bottom and use it like a traditional metal jig. But nobody I know is using it that way as it defeats some of the purpose.

Just for clarity, the jig is attached to a split ring and the split ring is attached to the solid ring that has the hooks and line attached as well. That is well illustrated in your last picture above. It's an important distinction because having the jig on a separate ring is what allows the jig to stay out of the way when fighting the fish and also helps impart free movement and action as the jig is deployed and retrieved.
 
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