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I have always wanted to get a nother kayak after I sold mine because of moving back in 2000, but cannot decide. I was going to get one last year, but found a canoe on sale instead that me and my young sons could all use. I have a time trying to decide what name brand, what type, and what size. I had a 10' sit-in before I am 6'3" and it was hard to get in and out of, but warm in winter. I would mostly be using it in late fall, winter, and early spring, the rest of the time I am a pier junckey chasing sheephead, flounder, kings, and spanish. Just looking for opinions on for what to use and what all of you use since I can't decide?
 

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I like a longer kayak as most of my fishing is on the large flatwater lakes in the triangle. Longer boat = better tracking = more efficient for long straight-line paddling (don't say faster, but...:)).

I'm also 6'4" and 250lbs, which warrants some extra capacity, especially when you load it down with gear.

I've got 2 pretty different boats - Heritage Redfish 14' and a Perception Search 15'. Both are sit-on-tops, so roughly the same topside but they have very different hulls.

The Redfish is flat bottomed - great primary and secondary stability. Its a little raft-like but still paddles very well. People with lower center of gravity than me can stand very well in this boat. It also has higher capacity (400lbs - this makes a real difference in how much water wants to push through the scuppers with me in it). I've got a rudder on this boat which helps a lot with drift control, countering strong winds and making sharper turns.

The Search has a much more rounded bottom, both side-to-side and front-to-back (rocker). Its got less primary stability (more side-to-side play) so it feels tippier, but still lots of secondary stability (refuses to tip over). The search is quicker off the start and probably faster overall, but I think the advantages are dulled by my weight. It takes on a little more water through the scuppers than the redfish with me and my gear in it.

Here are a couple of NCangler resources to help you figure out what people have and what they like:
 

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I noticed that Paddle Creek is on the list of expected vendors at the boat show in Raleigh on January 11 to 13... You might give them a call and see what they're planning to bring... or you could swing by the store...
 

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Well size certainly has something to do with.....both your size and the size of the kayak. For someone over 6 feet, I would think that a 10 foot boat would be too small. I have both a 12 foot and 14 foot Tarpon, from Wilderness. The 12 is for short jaunts out when I dont think I will be paddling long distances or need much tackle. And at 5' 10", it is comfortable but a 10 foot would seemed cramped.

The most important things, for me, when selecting a kayak are comfort, utility and "fishability". The last is a word I came up with when describing what I looked for many years ago in a kayak. I dont know that much about paddling, tracking, or other technical issues. But I do know about fishing from a kayak. And it has to "feel" right. So if you can find one that is comfortable, for long durations of casting, sitting and paddling. That can hold all of your fishing tackle (I am a minamilist) and meet any other personal preferences (weight, storage constraints, hauling method) etc....then you have probably found the right boat for you. Do keep in mind areas fished, currents, paddle distance, and all the technical issues as well.

Good luck in your search for the right boat.
 
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