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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So we have this subtropical cyclone thingy headed our way (maybe). Looks to me like she's going to push some water inland. I'm thinking the saltwater line is going to move up a bit, especially if the wind out runs the rain.

I'm thinking that, if you can brave it, the conditions will be rather nice for some finned friends to be further upriver.

Thoughts?
 

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High winds. They're suggesting 15-20 in the Piedmont and higher on the coast on Saturday. The upper reaches of Pamlico may be out of reach though.
 

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Depends on how much rain falls up river. Could dump so much fresh water into the river system that you'll be bass fishing at Ocracoke. Have to wait and see what happens.
 

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Typically an extreme low pressure will shut fishing down. The fish sense the change and it makes them "feel bad". Now they also sense it coming and will feed ahead of it and feed aggressively after it passes. There are exceptions some guys seem to find fish anyway but this is the typical scenario. Note it doesn't take a lot of wind especially from the E or ESE to really get the chop rolling on the Pam. So the trade for more salt push is dirty rough water. Depending on what the storm ends up doing as far as the track staying upriver and chasing the freshies might be the best bet. Or just stay home and work on your equipment. The season is just getting fired up so anything that can be done now beats losing good days to do later. Engine/trailer service, reel cleaning, tackle sorting etc.
 

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Greenmonster I've seen you talk about salt levels and wind and rain and whether the saltwater fish will be further up river or not. This is just my humble opinion but you don't need to be as concerned about salinity as you might think. It's been proven that specks can handle almost total freshwater for a time, red drum can survive in 100% fresh water (not reproduce tho) and I've heard flounder have been caught in the Neuse in Kinston. In turn largemouth bass and bream are caught in brackish water commonly. If the Reds or Trout aren't way upriver I don't think a weekend of East winds are going to push them into Washington. If the Reds or Trout are way upriver in the summer a 2 inch rain isn't going to push them out into the ocean right away. I just don't think inshore fish make 15 or 20 mile trips based on that days salinity level. Just my thoughts.
 

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Green monster has (I think) recently been reading a book I loaned him, "fishing the western pamlico". The author puts a lot of stock in salinity considerations. He speaks of "salt wedges" formed by prevailing winds and water temperature.

I don't fish enough to know if salinity really impacts the bite. I do know that rain and freshwater runoff seems to turn things off in the creeks I fish (bath, Durham, etc)

I've had my best - very limited- success in dry conditions, but that could be a water clarity issue as well.

Good discussion, I agree that salinity won't override natural migration patterns
 

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A sudden change in salinity levels can and will definitely impact the bite, but it isn't going to move the fish around all that much. They'll still be there, they just might have lock jaw. I've had amazing and pitiful results in as well as immediately following gale force winds and hurricane rains. Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't. I certainly wouldn't let it deter me from fishing because you definitely won't catch them from the house.
 

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A sudden change in salinity levels can and will definitely impact the bite, but it isn't going to move the fish around all that much. They'll still be there, they just might have lock jaw. I've had amazing and pitiful results in as well as immediately following gale force winds and hurricane rains. Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't. I certainly wouldn't let it deter me from fishing because you definitely won't catch them from the house.
Unless of course, you are in a "fish-house". :D

Sky Snow Building Window House
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks all, I guess that makes a lot more sense than fish migrating 50 miles every couple of days! What time of year do Flounder and Reds come up river towards Washington in decent numbers? Are they always around?
 

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I catch flounder in the summer and fall, but it's just a lucky fluke. You've got to be a darn good flounder fisherman to get a keeper these days. I caught 11 14" flounder in about an hour a couple of years ago in bath creek. Think I e csught two keepers in the past 2 years
 

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I would say mid May to mid October. You want to better your chances on reds and flounder sizes and numbers? Head to the areas near the mouth of the rivers. Cambell creek, Goose Creek, Hobucken area, Rose Bay, Mouth of the pungo area, Bay river. Just wait til Curtis Pelt starts putting up his flounder and red reports for the summer. It will have you drooling for sure.
 
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