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In the water..... seriously though the weather has them backed up. The females should start showing up anytime now, small males come first them the big mamas. I saw a few last week that could have been females along with some possible spawning activity. I am worried it maybe a here today gone tomorrow blitz.
 

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If you wonder why you are seeing less females there's an easy answer. Over harvesting. Think about it. Each time a female is taken out of the water that's less of a chance to replenish the stock of fish. Each female has thousands of eggs, let's say half of those eggs are female, half die because of mortality and predators leaving maybe 1000 eggs that survive. That's 1000 more females that would be around to catch if you just left the fish in the water. Now add up how many people take per day and you see quickly how fast it adds up. 25 fish per day with 100 anglers on over a weekend is easily 2500 fish gone from the stock of overall fish, most of them females. That's 250,000 females that could have been reproduced. The reason you see more males is because people are RELEASING the males. When you take a wild fish full of eggs you also take with it inbred DNA that allows its offspring to know where to run and spawn when it's time. So you are taking fish that have ingrained knowledge of what river to spawn in.

Full disclaimer, I am not a biologist and could be totally talking out of my rear.
 

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If you wonder why you are seeing less females there's an easy answer. Over harvesting. Think about it. Each time a female is taken out of the water that's less of a chance to replenish the stock of fish. Each female has thousands of eggs, let's say half of those eggs are female, half die because of mortality and predators leaving maybe 1000 eggs that survive. That's 1000 more females that would be around to catch if you just left the fish in the water. Now add up how many people take per day and you see quickly how fast it adds up. 25 fish per day with 100 anglers on over a weekend is easily 2500 fish gone from the stock of overall fish, most of them females. That's 250,000 females that could have been reproduced. The reason you see more males is because people are RELEASING the males. When you take a wild fish full of eggs you also take with it inbred DNA that allows its offspring to know where to run and spawn when it's time. So you are taking fish that have ingrained knowledge of what river to spawn in.

Full disclaimer, I am not a biologist and could be totally talking out of my rear.

Kev, I am a biologist, and you make perfect sense.
 

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I used to fish Penny's Bend but I can't handle the crowds. Fishing shoulder to should with someone and having 5 degrees of casting space isn't my thing. Caught some nice one's one day there 2 years ago. Other than that I just go up to some of the other creek access spots a bit further north. You don't get the size or numbers necessary, but it's something. This year I am not even bothering. I'll be at Crabtree going for carp :)
 

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In the water..... seriously though the weather has them backed up. The females should start showing up anytime now, small males come first them the big mamas. I saw a few last week that could have been females along with some possible spawning activity. I am worried it maybe a here today gone tomorrow blitz.
I don't really fish white bass, but I am curious what kind of breeding activities you witnessed.
 

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I saw some splashing along/close to a sandy flat on the river which I usually associate as spawning activity, but with the lack of females still not showing up in numbers I might have been mistaken.
 

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A few personal observations on the Eno run.
Out of the past 7 years I've been keeping up with it we've had 3 good years, one very poor year and, counting this year so far, 3 mediocre years.
No doubt that taking so many big females out of the river each year has a detrimental effect, but I think there's a lot more than that going on.

The first 3 years I fished the run there were huge schools of shad during the same time the white bass were in the river. I've seen very few in the past couple years. Hundreds of thousands of very aggressive and hungry white bass moving up these relatively small streams can clear out the small bait fish they feed on. They may need a year or 2 before there's sufficient food to sustain a good run.

The weather & water levels play a big part in the strength of the run. The worst year I've seen the water was very low and the run was pretty weak and over very quickly. Low water levels limit the areas they have to feed and the water temps and clarity also play a role. And lets don't forget those friendly little white perch .......

We have good years and bad. This year is so far shaping up to be lackluster, but I'm not ready to predict gloom & doom on the fishery just yet.
 

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went out yesterday to the eno and pulled 30+ males out. I pulled zero females out though, talked with a few guys while I was out there. lots of males being caught with little to no females. While I was there I saw a school of 7-10 large females headed up river but i wasn't in a position to throw anything in there direction :-/
 
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