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Do you support the stocking of non natve fishes?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you agree with stocking fish in places where they are not native?

For example walleye in Lake James and the Catawba River?
 

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It depends on the situation, like when they put flatheads in the cape fear, now it has some the best flathead fishing in the state. I read an article on how flatheads are causing a decrease in native fish species, but those are fish like shad, and other bait fish, and I would much rather catch a 40 pound flathead than a six inch long shad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah a lot of past fish stocking was with non native species.

Flathead catfish in the Cape Fear, Spotted bass in the Yadkin, Blue catfish in Lake Norman.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you vote no, that means you vote against stocking rainbows or browns anywhere in NC. I had to go with the sometimes answer.
90% of stocked rainbow and brown trout could be replaced with stocked brook trout and no fishing opportunities would be lost.

But many streams stocked with trout are not even native trout waters so you have a point.
 

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It depends on the situation, like when they put flatheads in the cape fear, now it has some the best flathead fishing in the state. I read an article on how flatheads are causing a decrease in native fish species, but those are fish like shad, and other bait fish, and I would much rather catch a 40 pound flathead than a six inch long shad.
There are plenty of articles on how flatheads have led to the decline of several species besides shad....other catfish species have taken it on the chin among other species.
 

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Non native species

Largemouth are native here, but spots are not.
I voted no, but for some reason didn't think about trout. Shoulda voted sometimes.
 

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Interesting that you picked walleye as an example, BTW. They are one of the few freshwater gamefish that tend to stay on the deep bottom (bentho-pelagic?) in cold lakes and don't tend to displace many other species, though they will have an impact on forage. But the only reason I have ever heard of a state regretting stocking them somewhere is when they don't do well and it was a waste of money.
 

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Walleye are voracious feeders. Honestly though I would rather see Pike stocked over walleye...much more fun to catch and better tasting fish also. Pike will eat a wider range of food as well.

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Walleye are voracious feeders. Honestly though I would rather see Pike stocked over walleye...much more fun to catch and better tasting fish also. Pike will eat a wider range of food as well.
Yeah, that's what I meant about the forage. You have to stock more shad or other forage (tangent - did you know kokanee were introduced into Lake Nantahala in the 60s for forage?) to support the walleye, but they won't be displacing other fish to a large degree as far as the part of the lake they live in. Pike on the other hand do displace some existing fish and eat them.

I agree that if you can get past the bones and the snot, pike are quite tasty.
 

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pike better tasting then walleye??? now that's something i've never heard. walleye are some of the best eating fresh water fish.
Any day of the week. Next time you catch a chain pickerel look up a recipe called poor man's lobster.

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Been throwing back pickerel since forever. My sister in law's grandmother used to get us to keep them for her, but she passed a long time ago. I have learned a thing or two about them lately on here, like how they can be cleaned to remove the bones, and now, how they are good eating. I guess I will keep the next one, and try this recipe.
 

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Something else to think about is what it might be like if they weren't around. They are good for tugging on a line, but I don't know many people who think they are the best on the table. Other species tug on lines too. Not to disparage largemouths -- they are my favorite fish to catch. Like you suggested, just thinking . . . :confused:
largemouth bass aren't native to NC ;) just something to think about
 

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I thought some strains of LMB were in some parts of the state, but the current predominant strain and its range are our doing for sure.

Largemouth are native to NC.
They ranged from Canada, the great lakes to the gulf and back up the eastern seaboard to Maryland. now they are stocked in all 50 states including Hawaii and Alaska.
Right off the WRC website.

They may not have been native to a mountain stream but they are native to the state.
Flathead are the same way. They are native to the state. The western part of the state.
All it takes is a duck to transport eggs on their legs.
 
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