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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=WV13#.VYyum0YmEUk

I've been looking at the above plans for a little while now and have thought about building it as a fishing kayak. I did a quick search and saw there's at least one member here who is building it (or maybe finished now?). I would probably use it for a little bass fishing, but I can usually hitch all the rides I want to on a bass boat, so I see myself using it down at the coast more than anything. I need a kayak to run baits out for shark fishing, but I would also like to try going a few miles offshore. Do y'all think this kayak would make a good platform for that?
 

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http://www.bateau.com/proddetail.php?prod=WV13#.VYyum0YmEUk

I've been looking at the above plans for a little while now and have thought about building it as a fishing kayak. I did a quick search and saw there's at least one member here who is building it (or maybe finished now?). I would probably use it for a little bass fishing, but I can usually hitch all the rides I want to on a bass boat, so I see myself using it down at the coast more than anything. I need a kayak to run baits out for shark fishing, but I would also like to try going a few miles offshore. Do y'all think this kayak would make a good platform for that?
Some may disagree with me, and that's ok, but I personally would have a tough time adapting a sit inside kayak for offshore. If one was determined they could probably adapt, but I feel like a sit on top offers a lot more options in rigging and gear hauling. Good luck, looks like a fun project.
 

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I agree with the above post. Sit on and sit in kayaks are "small" fishing. Real estate on these small craft is at a premium and your choice whichever it is is going to limit you.
Any boat big or small is a series of compromises.
The wave may or may not be more sporty when it comes to paddling but you give up something in return.
I'm building the 15 foot Wadefish by Jemwatercraft. It's stable but it's not like trying to paddle a barge. The plan massage-able to get it like I want it. I have made compromises here and there but there again...I do have room to store atleast 7 foot rods below deck between me and the bow. I also have room to install a 7x down and side imaging depth finder flush mounted.

It's not as easy a boat to build but is well within buildable for a first time builder that can read and comprehend CAD drawings and has atleast basic tools. the biggest learning curve is in using epoxy and laying glass. It's pretty simple once you do it once or twice. That's why some plans aren't recommended for a first boat.

But it's all going to boil down to what you want, what you just have to have in a boat, and what you would like to have but can live without. Once you outline that out on a piece of paper, that's going to just about put you on a plan dead nuts.


Building isn't exactly cheap either. An experienced builder can save quite a bit of money. Bigger the boat the more that can be saved.
A new builder is going to have to develop his techniques which is where a lot of the savings are.

Material and consumables wise I've got about 1500 mine but it's premium material. My extras, electronics and full rigging I'll have closer to 3 in it. Wouldn't sell it for less than 6 and would lose money at that price
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the feedback y'all! I might try and look into other plans or reconsider the kayak build altogether. I agree, a sit-on-top would be a lot better suited for what I have in mind. I just enjoy building things and get pleasure out of using things I've made. I was mainly considering the kayak build as a way to prep for building a larger boat. I have a 65 hp outboard that needs to be hung on another transom ha. I have a construction background, have rebuilt several boats, and built a canoe. I can probably get by with the experience I already have, so I might just buy the kayak :)
 

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If you enjoy building things I would build the boat.
You'll have a boat nobody else does because even building to a plan there are no two alike.
The customization possibilities are endless. You get more of what you want instead of more of what a manufacturer puts out there for the masses.
I don't know where you live but you can come by the shop, see the materials, and use some of them. Building these boats is not hard. Wood working experience is not necessary but it doesn't hurt.

I have made some patterns for the Wadefish 15-32 hull if you buy those plans. I can cut that hull with a trim router pretty quick.

I believe that one of life’s great moments is landing on an island
in a boat of one’s own building. ~Arch Davis
 

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Larger sit-in kayaks have been used for all sorts of offshore adventures and weathered lots of bad weather etc. etc....but they have smaller cockpit openings and are made weather and water tight with the addition of spray skirts and watertight bulkheads. Certainly can handle capsizes and self rescues if necessary... if the paddler is prepared and practiced for that... However, for launching in the surf...I think the sit on top would be the craft of choice. Much easier to get on and off of....and looks like you could go either route when building....
 
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